One of my most popular posts from July 8, 2013 Harvard Business School Professor John P. Kotter Years […]

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The genius of Steve Jobs lies in his hippie period and with his time at Reed College, the pre-eminent Liberal Arts college in North America. To his understanding of technology, Jobs brought an immersion in popular culture. In his 20s, he dated Joan Baez; Ella Fitzgerald sang at his 30th birthday party. His worldview was shaped by the ’60s counterculture in the San Francisco Bay Area, where he had grown up, the adopted son of a Silicon Valley machinist. When he graduated from high school in Cupertino in 1972, he said, “the very strong scent of the 1960s was still there. After dropping out of Reed College, a stronghold of liberal thought in Portland, Ore., in 1972, Mr. Jobs led a countercultural lifestyle himself. He told a reporter that taking LSD was one of the two or three most important things he had done in his life. He said there were things about him that people who had not tried psychedelics — even people who knew him well, including his wife — could never understand.

The unwritten promise of a post-secondary education has been to earn a degree in an applied field such as engineering and you’ll end up with a good, stable job, but the millennial generation is finding that can no longer be counted on. I have been thinking about this issue for some time. Last year, I posted an article on this blog by Robert Reich, Professor of Economics at UC Berkeley and former Secretary of Labor under Bill Clinton. I was stimulated to share that article by what I was seeing with my own students from the University of British Columbia, and contrasting that with my own experience years ago, walking into my Silicon Valley dream career by sheer chance. That simply no longer happens. Grads must begin plotting out a plan early, no later than the beginning of their third year, and begin to execute on it in order to find an entry-level position commensurate with their education. Networking and cold calling is imperative, but as this article points out, even that may not guarantee solid employment.

Yes, LinkedIn and Human Resources screening technology are suppressing hiring. The fact is, the task of submitting a resume’ that will make it past the filtering technology used by almost all recruiters these days, requires cunning and a shrewd understanding of how to manipulate these screening apps, something akin to Search Engine Optimization (SEO). However, HR SEO techniques requires a knowledge of the app itself, which is a closely guarded secret. WRT to LinkedIn, I have growing concerns that LinkedIn no longer meets the “WIIFM” test, or “what’s in it for me?” LinkedIn seems to have aligned its business and destiny more with the needs of the recruiting industry than with my own needs, while still trying to sell me on the benefits of paid “Premium Membership.” Increasingly blog discussions on the value of LinkedIn to business users are concluding that it’s value has diminished sharply. Perhaps the recruiting industry represents a bigger potential revenue stream and LinkedIn does not wish to reveal that to its individual users. Then there is the matter of the LinkedIn merger with Microsoft, which has left many observers underwhelmed, despite pronouncements of the exceptional strategic value to both companies.

There is a lot of hubris and fantasy here in the Okanagan that no amount of reality can kill. Contrasted with that is a political faction that wishes for nothing more than the status quo. In yet another example of Kelowna’s long-standing poor employment market, and bizarre claims of being a technology industry hub, high tech employment in the Okanagan is being curtailed by the mass exodus of qualified graduates to employers outside the Okanagan.

The World’s Most Connected People Have Disappeared From LinkedIn The most connected members of LinkedIn have vanished. What […]

I have been giving some serious thought to the importance of personal resilience in times of adversity. Terry Fox comes up as a prime example of resilience that has inspired people all over the World. But how do such people develop it? Can it be learned? It is a character trait that appears difficult to measure, only appearing in certain people and not others when faced with a severe personal challenge. It is something that all management professionals should ponder carefully because such challenges will most certainly appear in their careers.

 Let’s be frank. Finding a decent job commensurate with your new UBC degree in Management has become extremely difficult. I have blogged previously here on the discounted value of a degree, as explained by UC Berkeley economist and former U.S. Secretary of Labor, Robert Reich.  For those living in the Okanagan or hoping to stay here to enjoy the sunshine, I urge you to relocate to a region with better employment prospects. BC Business recently published a ranking of BC cities for employment prospects.  Kelowna ranked 17th, despite being the second largest region in B.C..   Calgary is no better option for jobs these days.

new grad need job

READ MORE: Okanagan Economy And Jobs Market Likely To Worsen

The following list of potential employers is admittedly U.S. focused but it does give you some idea of kind of things you should look for in Canada.  Calgary is no longer a good option due to the oil price slump, expected by Goldman Sachs to last at least five years. Avoid the Energy Industry completely unless it is renewable energy, a growth industry. So not much opportunity in fossil fuels industry for the foreseeable future. Two of the ten below are immediately off this list for that reason alone: Chevron and Schlumberger.  In Canada, some UBC FOM graduates have found internships and entry-level positions in financial services companies like Edward Jones. High tech companies like Cisco Systems, Intel, and many others offer internships, but the competition is fierce. If you haven’t already done some serious advance work, you are probably out of the running. Don’t write off smaller companies if they are in an interesting industry.  If you can afford it, social entrepreneurship may pay dividends to your career.  Bottom line: if you want a good internship opportunity you are going to need to cast your net much further than you may have thought. work all possible network connections, and don’t be shy about asking for “informational interviews” with companies you are targeting. Looking in British Columbia only will be limiting though there are a few good companies, so it may be necessary to look across Canada. Follow the strengths of your aptitude, and people you know who can help you. Ask any FOM alumni who has managed to find a good entry-level position and they will tell you that it was a long, hard process. As my tag line says, “The harder I work, the luckier I get.”

REBLOGGED from CNNMoney:

Challenging projects. The real-world impact of one’s work. Access to company leaders. Free food.

These are some of the hallmarks of a great internship, according to reviews on the jobs site Glassdoor, which recently published its annual list of the highest-rated companies for interns.

Four of the firms in the top 10 are big tech companies; two are in the oil and gas sector, and there’s one each in media, finance, health and business consulting.

The interns who offered anonymous reviews of the companies where they worked also reported their pay. Average amounts for each company ranged from $1,722 to $7,214 a month.

CNNMoney contacted the 10 companies: three confirmed the pay numbers were in the ballpark, four wouldn’t confirm but said they pay competitively, and three didn’t respond. The survey didn’t distinguish between undergrad and grad student interns. Companies may pay graduate students more, so the average pay reported may be higher than what undergrad interns could earn in some cases.

Each company on the list is actively hiring for interns. And geographically, Glassdoor data show that New York currently has the most open internships (2,500), followed by San Francisco (1,500) and Los Angeles (1,400).

  • Company
  • Avg. monthly pay interns reported
  • What interns say
  • Facebook
    $6,779 (software engineer intern) $6,058 (intern)
    Great culture, challenging tasks, access to anyone in company
  • Chevron
    $6,001
    Professionalism, they invest in you, lots of opportunities
  • Google
    $6,788 (software engineer intern) $7,214 (intern)
    Able to make an impact, supportive managers and co-workers, lots of training
  • Quicken Loans
    $1,850
    Learned a lot about mortgage industry, room for personal growth, free lunch
  • eBay
    $5,893 (software engineer intern)
    Felt appreciated, got to work with top execs, “Bagel Wednesdays”
  • Yahoo
    $5,178
    Everyone’s energetic and dedicated; Marissa Mayer a great leader
  • Epic Systems
    $5,003 (software developer intern)
    Well-defined projects, flexibility, fun events for interns every few days
  • Schlumberger
    $5,607
    Lots of learning opportunities, real projects, everyone helpful
  • NBCUniversal
    $1,722
    Great program, professional development sessions beyond your specific job
  • Boston Consulting
    Group
    $5,566
    Surrounded by talent; friendly management; career development made a priority