Originally posted on Gigaom:
Add another point to the D-Wave Systems scorecard. Researchers at the University of Southern California have…


In this, my third post on the dramatic and fascinating developments, shifts, and impacts of the Multidimensional Mobile Market War, the precipitous decline of the leading personal computer industry competitors, has become even more pronounced than anyone suspected. Last week, IDC and Gartner were in more or less violent agreement that the bottom had very suddenly dropped out of the PC market.


This is a very Big Deal, which increases the likelihood that Big Data will be a very Big Deal.

While the Canadian economy is expected to languish in the doldrums for the foreseeable future, D-Wave, a Vancouver quantum computing company, with e@UBC funding, is making big waves (pun intended). Seemingly out of the blue we now have two Vancouver companies that may be showing Canada the way out of its “natural resource curse:” D-Wave and potentially also Hootsuite.


I came across this book during my most recent visit to the UBC Vancouver campus. As good as I think this book is at focusing attention, in workbook style, on the importance of market and industry analysis, there is an issue that I think is not adequately addressed by any model or theory: not Porter, not STEEP or SWAT. Convergence is the issue.


I started this post to make a relative mundane point for UBC Management students about the importance of making their presentations easily understandable, particularly when they involve lots of numbers or spreadsheet data. But after mulling over the post for a few days, I realized that this is a much bigger story.


Paul Ottelini, Intel CEO, CES Keynote Speaker 2013 http://gizmodo.com/5973896/intels-new-chips-everything-you-need-to-know-updating  Intel’s drive to dramatically reduce power consumption generally, and […]