Too Many Web Apps, Too Little Money

Web app development is yet another case of the 1% versus the 99%. Only one percent of Web […]

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French President Emmanuel Macron’s vow to make France a ‘start-up nation’ amid the uncertainty over Brexit is raising the question of whether Paris could supplant London as the capital of European tech. Since his election, Macron has wooed tech entrepreneurs with a string of initiatives in the form of lavish tax breaks, subsidies, and credits for research. In March 2018, he promised to invest €1.5 billion into artificial intelligence research through 2022. Some of these initiatives, in addition to Macron’s dynamism, have lured British tech companies who are looking to gain a foothold in Europe.

Welcome to Mayo615’s Odyssey to France and the first of our Tuesday weekly updates. We invite you to subscribe to our YouTube Channel and follow our weekly updates. In this Week One update we will focus on my first Big Idea, and how I achieved it.  I will also discuss my three most important key takeaways from that experience. We hope that you find this video helpful in achieving your own Big Ideas and goals. So here we go.

Many observers and former employees say it is run like an offshore sweatshop, complete with stressful bullying No quality customer service can come from such a dysfunctional work environment. The gig economy philosophy is apparent with employee’s reduced to total submission to draconian work rules, total surveillance of all voice and written communication, and apparent high turnover. Burnout is common. Three years ago, there was something of a Sykes employee revolt, when a number of supervisory employees were fired, and an anonymous broadcast email was posted describing the poor management practices. Outsourcing like this has been a common means to cut costs in the wireless industry.

If You Get Technology “Convergence” Wrong, Nothing Else Matters I came across this book during my most recent […]

I found this important editorial opinion piece in The Guardian, the UK journal. The point of this is, […]

Students of Industry Analysis may be interested in this. For my January 2012 Industry Analysis course focused on the semiconductor industry, I set up an imaginary portfolio, using only industry analysis macro information. My Wall Street Journal portfolio of 13 semiconductor companies, covered a wide range of application markets. I would NOT recommend this as a serious portfolio strategy due to the highly cyclical and volatile nature of this industry. However, my overall gain over 2 years has been 32.87%. The top gainer, Micron Technologies (296.73%), lost its CEO in a plane crash after I invested but obviously recovered. The other two top gainers, ARM (112.70%), and Texas Instruments (56.71%) are both heavily involved in wireless communication chips.