A detailed report, prepared by Finite State, a Columbus, Ohio-based cybersecurity firm, concludes that Huawei telecom switching gear is far more vulnerable to hacking than other vendors’ hardware due to firmware flaws and inadvertent “back doors” that were discovered. The report has been circulated widely among cybersecurity experts in the U.S. and UK, and it is considered credible.

Managing The Accelerated Corporate Lifecycle


Anyone starting a new company should understand the concept of the “corporate life cycle”, and use it as a guide for understanding where the company is in that cycle, to understand the risks at each stage, and to recognize the need for action to change course. This graphic shows a typical corporate life cycle and different possible paths as the company matures. Management of the corporate life cycle also dovetails with the concept of a “strategic inflection point,” which I briefly discussed in my Week 5 Report, The Internet of Things. John Chambers, the former CEO of Cisco Systems has pointed out that the rapid acceleration in market changes has also accelerated the corporate life cycle, emphasizing the importance of understanding it. Companies abound that were initially very successful and yet eventually closed their doors, or were acquired because the company did not anticipate market changes and the need to adapt to the new situation.


Five years ago, I wrote a post on this blog disparaging the state of the Internet of Things/home automation market as a “Tower of Proprietary Babble.” Vendors of many different home and industrial product offerings were literally speaking different languages, making their products inoperable with other complementary products from other vendors.  The market was being constrained by its immaturity and a failure to grasp the importance of open standards. A 2017 Verizon report concluded that “an absence of industry-wide standards…represented greater than 50% of executives concerns about IoT. Today I can report that finally, the solutions and technologies are beginning to come together, albeit still slowly. 


The term “Internet of Things”  (IoT) is being loosely tossed around in the media.  But what does it […]


In the simplest terms, the concept here is how a company can potentially increase both revenue and market share by executing a strategy to work with direct or indirect competitor(s) to the benefit of both, a win-win. The old Arab saying, “My enemy’s enemy is my friend” also applies. It can also be as simple as joining an ad hoc collaboration among a group of companies or a standards group to create market order and simplicity from an overcrowded and confused market. Customers invariably respond to products that provide the greatest value and paths to long-term increased value and cost reduction. Collaboration or “Co-opetition” is one of the most effective means to achieve that goal, particularly in an economic environment where “flat is the new up.”


 Let’s be frank. Finding a decent job commensurate with your new UBC degree in Management has become extremely difficult. I have blogged previously here on the discounted value of a degree, as explained by UC Berkeley economist and former U.S. Secretary of Labor, Robert Reich.  For those living in the Okanagan or hoping to stay here to enjoy the sunshine, I urge you to relocate to a region with better employment prospects. BC Business recently published a ranking of BC cities for employment prospects.  Kelowna ranked 17th, despite being the second largest region in B.C..   Calgary is no better option for jobs these days.

new grad need job

READ MORE: Okanagan Economy And Jobs Market Likely To Worsen

The following list of potential employers is admittedly U.S. focused but it does give you some idea of kind of things you should look for in Canada.  Calgary is no longer a good option due to the oil price slump, expected by Goldman Sachs to last at least five years. Avoid the Energy Industry completely unless it is renewable energy, a growth industry. So not much opportunity in fossil fuels industry for the foreseeable future. Two of the ten below are immediately off this list for that reason alone: Chevron and Schlumberger.  In Canada, some UBC FOM graduates have found internships and entry-level positions in financial services companies like Edward Jones. High tech companies like Cisco Systems, Intel, and many others offer internships, but the competition is fierce. If you haven’t already done some serious advance work, you are probably out of the running. Don’t write off smaller companies if they are in an interesting industry.  If you can afford it, social entrepreneurship may pay dividends to your career.  Bottom line: if you want a good internship opportunity you are going to need to cast your net much further than you may have thought. work all possible network connections, and don’t be shy about asking for “informational interviews” with companies you are targeting. Looking in British Columbia only will be limiting though there are a few good companies, so it may be necessary to look across Canada. Follow the strengths of your aptitude, and people you know who can help you. Ask any FOM alumni who has managed to find a good entry-level position and they will tell you that it was a long, hard process. As my tag line says, “The harder I work, the luckier I get.”

REBLOGGED from CNNMoney:

Challenging projects. The real-world impact of one’s work. Access to company leaders. Free food.

These are some of the hallmarks of a great internship, according to reviews on the jobs site Glassdoor, which recently published its annual list of the highest-rated companies for interns.

Four of the firms in the top 10 are big tech companies; two are in the oil and gas sector, and there’s one each in media, finance, health and business consulting.

The interns who offered anonymous reviews of the companies where they worked also reported their pay. Average amounts for each company ranged from $1,722 to $7,214 a month.

CNNMoney contacted the 10 companies: three confirmed the pay numbers were in the ballpark, four wouldn’t confirm but said they pay competitively, and three didn’t respond. The survey didn’t distinguish between undergrad and grad student interns. Companies may pay graduate students more, so the average pay reported may be higher than what undergrad interns could earn in some cases.

Each company on the list is actively hiring for interns. And geographically, Glassdoor data show that New York currently has the most open internships (2,500), followed by San Francisco (1,500) and Los Angeles (1,400).

  • Company
  • Avg. monthly pay interns reported
  • What interns say
  • Facebook
    $6,779 (software engineer intern) $6,058 (intern)
    Great culture, challenging tasks, access to anyone in company
  • Chevron
    $6,001
    Professionalism, they invest in you, lots of opportunities
  • Google
    $6,788 (software engineer intern) $7,214 (intern)
    Able to make an impact, supportive managers and co-workers, lots of training
  • Quicken Loans
    $1,850
    Learned a lot about mortgage industry, room for personal growth, free lunch
  • eBay
    $5,893 (software engineer intern)
    Felt appreciated, got to work with top execs, “Bagel Wednesdays”
  • Yahoo
    $5,178
    Everyone’s energetic and dedicated; Marissa Mayer a great leader
  • Epic Systems
    $5,003 (software developer intern)
    Well-defined projects, flexibility, fun events for interns every few days
  • Schlumberger
    $5,607
    Lots of learning opportunities, real projects, everyone helpful
  • NBCUniversal
    $1,722
    Great program, professional development sessions beyond your specific job
  • Boston Consulting
    Group
    $5,566
    Surrounded by talent; friendly management; career development made a priority

LinkedIn shares yesterday plummeted precipitously after the company announced poorer than expected results, and downgraded prospects for the remainder of the year. Looking beyond the downgraded forecast and the costs associated with the $1.5 Billion acquisition of lynda.com, some analysts scrutinizing the press release, noted that there was no growth reported in the user base of “over 350 million users”, despite moves into China and other markets. Premium user revenue grew significantly but that did not come near to offsetting the total revenue number. Revenue and number of users are the two numbers followed most closely by investment analysts.
LinkedIn’s recent acquisitions have been noted as a LinkedIn strategy for compensating for flat overall user growth, and for diversifying into new markets to augment growth.