If You Get Technology “Convergence” Wrong, Nothing Else Matters I came across this book during my most recent […]

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Since I joined the high-tech industry years ago, Silicon Valley has had a fundamental need for highly educated engineers and scientists that could not be filled by American graduates. This reality has been bemoaned by Congressional politicians for decades now, who have essentially done nothing to increase the emphasis on STEM education (science, technology, engineering, and math) for resident Americans, and who instead chose to provide the H1-B Visa enabling Silicon Valley high-tech companies to employ immigrants to fill these crucial positions, and has enabled the high-tech industry to thrive. The election of Donald Trump has changed all that. His platform is almost completely devoid of any acknowledgment of the crucial importance of high-tech innovation to U.S. productivity and economic growth, the need for H1-B immigrants and the parallel need for greater investment in STEM education.

In the simplest terms, the concept here is how a company can potentially increase both revenue and market share by executing a strategy to work with direct or indirect competitor(s) to the benefit of both, a win-win. The old Arab saying, “My enemy’s enemy is my friend” also applies. It can also be as simple as joining an ad hoc collaboration among a group of companies or a standards group to create market order and simplicity from an overcrowded and confused market. Customers invariably respond to products that provide the greatest value and paths to long-term increased value and cost reduction. Collaboration or “Co-opetition” is one of the most effective means to achieve that goal, particularly in an economic environment where “flat is the new up.”

 Let’s be frank. Finding a decent job commensurate with your new UBC degree in Management has become extremely difficult. I have blogged previously here on the discounted value of a degree, as explained by UC Berkeley economist and former U.S. Secretary of Labor, Robert Reich.  For those living in the Okanagan or hoping to stay here to enjoy the sunshine, I urge you to relocate to a region with better employment prospects. BC Business recently published a ranking of BC cities for employment prospects.  Kelowna ranked 17th, despite being the second largest region in B.C..   Calgary is no better option for jobs these days.

new grad need job

READ MORE: Okanagan Economy And Jobs Market Likely To Worsen

The following list of potential employers is admittedly U.S. focused but it does give you some idea of kind of things you should look for in Canada.  Calgary is no longer a good option due to the oil price slump, expected by Goldman Sachs to last at least five years. Avoid the Energy Industry completely unless it is renewable energy, a growth industry. So not much opportunity in fossil fuels industry for the foreseeable future. Two of the ten below are immediately off this list for that reason alone: Chevron and Schlumberger.  In Canada, some UBC FOM graduates have found internships and entry-level positions in financial services companies like Edward Jones. High tech companies like Cisco Systems, Intel, and many others offer internships, but the competition is fierce. If you haven’t already done some serious advance work, you are probably out of the running. Don’t write off smaller companies if they are in an interesting industry.  If you can afford it, social entrepreneurship may pay dividends to your career.  Bottom line: if you want a good internship opportunity you are going to need to cast your net much further than you may have thought. work all possible network connections, and don’t be shy about asking for “informational interviews” with companies you are targeting. Looking in British Columbia only will be limiting though there are a few good companies, so it may be necessary to look across Canada. Follow the strengths of your aptitude, and people you know who can help you. Ask any FOM alumni who has managed to find a good entry-level position and they will tell you that it was a long, hard process. As my tag line says, “The harder I work, the luckier I get.”

REBLOGGED from CNNMoney:

Challenging projects. The real-world impact of one’s work. Access to company leaders. Free food.

These are some of the hallmarks of a great internship, according to reviews on the jobs site Glassdoor, which recently published its annual list of the highest-rated companies for interns.

Four of the firms in the top 10 are big tech companies; two are in the oil and gas sector, and there’s one each in media, finance, health and business consulting.

The interns who offered anonymous reviews of the companies where they worked also reported their pay. Average amounts for each company ranged from $1,722 to $7,214 a month.

CNNMoney contacted the 10 companies: three confirmed the pay numbers were in the ballpark, four wouldn’t confirm but said they pay competitively, and three didn’t respond. The survey didn’t distinguish between undergrad and grad student interns. Companies may pay graduate students more, so the average pay reported may be higher than what undergrad interns could earn in some cases.

Each company on the list is actively hiring for interns. And geographically, Glassdoor data show that New York currently has the most open internships (2,500), followed by San Francisco (1,500) and Los Angeles (1,400).

  • Company
  • Avg. monthly pay interns reported
  • What interns say
  • Facebook
    $6,779 (software engineer intern) $6,058 (intern)
    Great culture, challenging tasks, access to anyone in company
  • Chevron
    $6,001
    Professionalism, they invest in you, lots of opportunities
  • Google
    $6,788 (software engineer intern) $7,214 (intern)
    Able to make an impact, supportive managers and co-workers, lots of training
  • Quicken Loans
    $1,850
    Learned a lot about mortgage industry, room for personal growth, free lunch
  • eBay
    $5,893 (software engineer intern)
    Felt appreciated, got to work with top execs, “Bagel Wednesdays”
  • Yahoo
    $5,178
    Everyone’s energetic and dedicated; Marissa Mayer a great leader
  • Epic Systems
    $5,003 (software developer intern)
    Well-defined projects, flexibility, fun events for interns every few days
  • Schlumberger
    $5,607
    Lots of learning opportunities, real projects, everyone helpful
  • NBCUniversal
    $1,722
    Great program, professional development sessions beyond your specific job
  • Boston Consulting
    Group
    $5,566
    Surrounded by talent; friendly management; career development made a priority

Gordon Moore, now 86, is still spry and still given to the dry sense of humor for which he has always been known. In an Intel interview this year he said that he had Googled “Moore’s Law” and “Murphy’s Law,” and Moore’s beat Murphy’s by two to one,” demonstrating how ubiquitous is the usage of Dr. Moore’s observation. This week we are commemorating the 50th anniversary of the April 19, 1965 issue of Electronics magazine, in which Dr. Moore first described his vision of doubling the number of transistors on a chip every year or so.

This is not the Letterman Show. But it is very funny.. Scott McNealy, former CEO of Sun Microsystem’s keynote address at an enterprise computing conference held in Pacific Grove a month or so ago. Scott is not particularly well known for his humor and perhaps better known informally for his appreciation of ice hockey. Someone must have helped him with this Top Ten list list of “reasons you ( or your Chief Information Officer) is not ready for today’s new online world.”

In this, my third post on the dramatic and fascinating developments, shifts, and impacts of the Multidimensional Mobile Market War, the precipitous decline of the leading personal computer industry competitors, has become even more pronounced than anyone suspected. Last week, IDC and Gartner were in more or less violent agreement that the bottom had very suddenly dropped out of the PC market.

In a further episode of my earlier posts on the Mega Mobile Market Share War, it would seem that International Data Corporation (IDC) and Gartner, the two leading high tech industry analysis firms, are haggling over whether the precipitous drop in quarterly PC sales is 11. 2% or 14%. It also adds evidence to the accelerating rate of change in the corporate life cycle. Corporate life cycle events that took a decade are now occurring in a few short years.

I came across this book during my most recent visit to the UBC Vancouver campus. As good as I think this book is at focusing attention, in workbook style, on the importance of market and industry analysis, there is an issue that I think is not adequately addressed by any model or theory: not Porter, not STEEP or SWAT. Convergence is the issue.